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Commonwealth Europe: 1810 by mdc01957 Commonwealth Europe: 1810 by mdc01957
Here's the very first map-profile for 2013! Or rather, that's a little bit of a lie, since this was first thought of shortly before that December vacation and that it was only finished recently. ^^;

Anyway, this one came about as a result of reading up on Poland, Lithuania and a very strange game of Empire: Total War where their Commonwealth got more than lucky, in a sense becoming a reversal of what Prussia became in our world. So what it loses in realism, I hope to make this as plausible as possible in alternate history form. Hope you enjoy it!

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It has been centuries since the Union of Lublin in 1569, when the Kingdom of Poland and Grand Duchy of Lithuania forged their Commonwealth under the Golden Liberty. Faced with threats both within and without, it seemed to some of the leading realms of Europe that this strange realm was doomed to fail. But despite the odds, and more than a few fortunate streaks from its generals, merchants and leaders, it had done much more than persevere, becoming a major power in its own right. Indeed, their reach had gone to the point wherein, had the union crumbled, the Continent's history would have changed considerably.

Even past the dawn of the 19th Century, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth holds firm in Eastern Europe. It is in many ways a paradox: a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural and elective, nigh-republican monarchy whose people value tolerance and freedom with high regard. While Poland and Lithuania are still the dominant forces in their federation (being the centers of the whole union), ever since the Prussian defeat in 1728 it has sought to extend equal representation to all citizens, whatever their origin. Their current prestige is far from perfect, however. Even with all the prosperity and subsequent reforms, corruption among the nobility and ruling classes remains an issue. While the Germans, Tartars and Cossacks have largely been tamed and accepting, there still exists discontent by what some claim to be "inner colonization" of their lands.

To its south and west, it has since found reliable allies among the British (themselves the rulers of an increasingly powerful empire), royal Bavarians and the South Slavs (the result of a daring expedition into former Ottoman-held territories in Serbia and Bulgaria). The closest they have to a kindred spirit however lie in the Habsburg Empire, itself increasingly taking after the Commonwealth's example (with Poland in particular aiding the Hungarians in their quest for equal partnership with Austria) as well as replacing Prussia as the leading German power, although Silesia remains a sensitive issue between the two realms.

They are not without rivals however. To the north, Sweden had since unified Scandinavia and extended its influence into the states of northern Germany. The Nordics' reach has grown such that, as with the Commonwealth ironically enough, they actively threaten the increasingly weak Russian Empire. While further south, both the restored Ottoman Empire (the Sultan coming back in 1786 after a republican uprising, albeit integrating their reforms) and the Holy Kingdom of Spain (the Habsburgs of Spain having styled themselves and their realm in a more theocratic mold) compete over the Mediterranean.

Whatever the future holds however, with the burgeoning advances in industry, surely the Commonwealth is poised to continue prospering well into tomorrow.
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:icongigoxxiii:
GigoXXIII Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Now that I think of it this vaguely reminds me of what happened in the creation of my Hapsburg Commonwealth from Lamnays map game only while they sorted all the crowns problems out it went the worst way it could possibly go in the form of a evil hapsburg poland wank XD quite bizzare looking back on that decision
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2013
Consider this a considerably more benevolent if rather Imperialist version. ;)
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:icongigoxxiii:
GigoXXIII Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Imperialism on its own it not allways exactly bad it depends on the nation, the people and the leaders although even the nicer forms of it are taking someone elses lands but everyone did it or would if they could. Whats caused Russia to slowly weaken and crumble ?, the autocracy or just a bad series of tsars ?
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2013
I agree with you there. As for Russia, it's more on the bad tsars and unflinchingly lousy policies than on the Tsarist regime itself. Then again, the Soviets did a good job practically rewriting the Imperial era as one of decadence and misery, while the far-right have hijacked that period as a theocratic utopia. :(
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:icongigoxxiii:
GigoXXIII Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd personally say the tsarist system was a mix of good and bad, both Peter the Great and Catherine the Great were excellent if flawed rulers, so it seems like other then some bad tsars and tsarinas the main problem was how behind the time Russia was as it was still largely feudalish in 1914 even though serfdom had been ended nothing really changed or so everything I'v studyed points to. Basicly the odd bad ruler plus a system that was by then hopelessly behind the times and refusal to compromise even slightly with modernity caused all the trouble although without the revolution I find it hard to imagine anything really bringing the system down short or war or gradual reform like that witnessed in BRTS
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013
Really, Tsar Nicholas II, World War I, the inexplicable decision to let Rasputin loose and their combined fallout in general practically made it easy for Lenin to swoop in.
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:icongigoxxiii:
GigoXXIII Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Even then if Germany had changed its mind Lenin would likely have never made it back, they did sent him there to cause trouble.... thats one of Germanys WWI decisions that I think is not exusable even as a desperate measure considering what it lead to and I'm normal sympathetic Germany for how it was unfearly blamed for everything
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2013
Interestingly, the Austro-Hungarians led by Emperor-King Karl tried to STOP the Kaiser from pushing through with it. The Germans simply forced them to agree with the plan.
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(1 Reply)
:iconquantumbranching:
QuantumBranching Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013
This is truly excellent, although you could have used a slightly larger font for your notes on the map.
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:iconmdc01957:
mdc01957 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013
My bad. ^^;

Still, thanks! It's actually a tempered version of a Total War game I've played recently. Though how plausible is a powerful Poland-Lithuania with Habsburg and British support? :?
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